'Longevity Secrets Of Okinawans' Brought To Holden

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Tricia Silverman, of NuTricia’s Lifestyles, will present "Longevity Secrets Of Okinawans" at the Holden Senior Center Photo Credit: Daniel Castro

HOLDEN, Mass. – The Holden Council on Aging and the Holden Cultural Council are sponsoring a free nutrition seminar titled “The Longevity Secrets of the Okinawans” at the Holden Senior Center on July 16.

Okinawa, a district of Japan, has the world’s highest population of people living at 100 years of age or older. Elders in Okinawa are highly respected, and spirituality, physical activity, and a diet emphasizing natural unprocessed foods are just some of the ingredients in the Okinawan recipe for a long healthy life.

“If more Americans led their lives following the habits of the traditional Okinawans, they would have less obesity, cancer and heart disease. Not only would they live longer lives, but their senior years would be filled with more zest and vitality, with less disability as they age. And it’s pretty simple… it starts with eating more…fruits and vegetables, that is.” said Tricia Silverman, Registered Dietitian and Nutrition Expert, owner of NuTricia’s Lifestyles, a nutrition and business consulting firm in Needham.

Silverman is a professional speaker and specializes in offering fun and informative wellness presentations. She has given hundreds of healthy seminars and has presented at the Massachusetts Dietetic Association and Maryland Dietetic Association.

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Holden Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency, and the Holden Council on Aging.

This seminar is open to all members of the community. Residents are encouraged to register at 508-210-5570. The event will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. on Monday, July 16 at the Holden Senior Center at 1130 Main Street, Holden.


 

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